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How EdTech can help close the attainment gap

How EdTech can help close the attainment gap

Great education is a right for all. Regardless of background, learning is something that all children and young people should have access to. Not every student comes to the classroom with the same ability. Levels of attainment are often variable across a class, for multiple reasons, including natural talent, family support, available resources and more. 

Differences in school achievement affect future chances, and act as a block on social for those from disadvantaged backgrounds. The Sutton Trust report that children with poor vocabulary age five are more than twice as likely to be unemployed aged 34.  A study by the Education Policy Institute thinktank found attainment gap has the most persistently disadvantaged pupils now almost two years (22.6 months) behind their peers by the time they finish their GCSEs. 
The right use of technology can help teachers target interventions to help reduce the attainment gap. By utilising a range of tools, they can engage students who might be underachieving, helping to increase their learning outputs and outcomes.

In 2017, the government estimated the school population would increase 19 per cent over the next decade, meaning around half a million more students in secondary school by 2026. This means that there will be more varied abilities and diverse classrooms – but every student needs to get the teaching that works for them. Technology allows teachers to scale up their resources and teaching, at the same time as offering more personalised learning.  EdTech can help lift the burden of admin from teachers, freeing up vital time to spend with their students, rather than spending it on lesson planning and bureaucratic paperwork.

Technology makes for a more dynamic classroom formation, and increases levels of interaction. Clevertouch IMPACT Plus can be operated remotely, so teachers don’t need to be at the front of the classroom, but can spend some one on one time to give individual attention. 

The right level of work can be set for pupils regardless of their ability, and feedback given in real time. Pupils who might need to revisit or revise particular concepts can access them when they are at home or in lesson breaks. Those with special educational needs can get additional support when needed. This extra time and focus can help close the attainment gap.

Edtech also allows for teachers to share concepts and ideas amongst themselves. Resources can be adapted and feedback given, so that teachers know what works, and what doesn’t. A collaborative approach means that resources that work can be utilised across a school or even a region, raising standards across the board. The government’s plans to provide high speed internet connectivity for all schools by 2033 will provide opportunities for education providers to move to cloud-based services and storage. This means that even those in the most disadvantaged areas will be able to access the resources they need.

Cost is obviously a big impact. Not all schools and teachers can afford the latest hardware. Having as much based in the cloud as possible means that it is accessible on all devices, no matter where people are. With Clevertouch it’s possible to seamlessly switch between Android and PC modes, and used existing services such as Google classroom or Microsoft packages. Rather than a huge outlay and investment, the tools can be integrated with existing ways of working. This both reduces cost and time. 

Digital technologies have been shown to help improve access for students with disabilities, who might find typical methods of interacting in the classroom difficult. They’ve been found to make it easier for less confident pupils to make a comment or put a point across. 

The right use of technology allows teachers to individualise learning so that students can work in the ways that best suit them and at their own pace. Teachers can provide support with good quality feedback and deliver more targeted intervention where necessary, monitoring progress more closely.

All students can benefit from technology. In an inclusive and democratic learning environment, EdTech can transform the education experience and help lessen the attainment gap for pupils from all backgrounds.

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The right use of technology can help teachers target interventions to help reduce the attainment gap. By utilising a range of tools, they can engage students who might be underachieving, helping to increase their learning outputs and outcomes.“